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Eighth Grade Cooking & Food Science Science Projects (11 results)

Who doesn't love food? It's fun to make, it's fun to eat, it's fun to ...study? That's right! There is a lot of science that goes into the everyday foods that you love. Try one of our food science projects to explore questions such as how baking ingredients work, how and why certain ingredients mix well together, and why people's tastes differ.

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Science Fair Project Idea
Sometimes on a busy day, it is hard to get things done. The rush to get things done can start first thing in the morning, when you are so busy getting ready and gathering your homework, that you barely have time for breakfast. It takes time to get a nutritious meal ready. But, eggs are a perfect choice for breakfast because they can be cooked quickly and in many different ways. A soft-boiled egg is a choice that many people make. They like the way the thickened, tasty yolk coats their hash… Read more
FoodSci_p046
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites Access to a stove top
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety Adult supervision is required. Exercise caution when working with a stove top. There is a chance that eggs can carry a bacteria called Salmonella. Salmonella can cause severe food poisoning. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention () recommend avoiding eating eggs unless the whites and yolks are both firmly cooked. For this reason, we do not recommend eating the soft-boiled eggs in this science project; just make observations. If you would like to eat them, consider doing your science project with pasteurized eggs.
Science Fair Project Idea
You know that sugar makes food sweet, but did you know that there are different kinds of sugar? Sucrose is the granulated sugar that you usually use for baking. Another kind of sugar, which is found in honey and in many fruits, is glucose. In this science project, you will measure the concentration of glucose in a variety of foods. You will use special test strips that change color in response to glucose to measure the glucose concentration in different foods. Read more
FoodSci_p049
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability A Sugar Metabolism Kit containing most of the specialty supplies needed for this project is available from our partner .
Cost Average ($40 - $80)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
You know there is sugar in non-diet soda, but just how much sugar? Sure, you can look on the ingredients label, but how do food scientists actually measure the amount of sugar in a solution? They use a simple scientific device called a hydrometer. The hydrometer floats in the solution that is being tested, and the higher it floats, the more sugar there is! In this science fair project, you will use a precision hydrometer to measure the amount of sugar in soda. Read more
FoodSci_p056
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability A precision hydrometer is required. See the Materials and Equipment list for details.
Cost Average ($50 - $100)
Safety Adult supervision is recommended. Use caution, as the hydrometer could break into sharp pieces of glass if dropped.
Science Fair Project Idea
Forget drinking your juice. Instead, try snacking on it! Use the steps and recipes in this food science project to transform drinks into semi-solid balls that pop in your mouth. The technique is called spherification and it is part of a larger food science trend called molecular gastronomy— but we just call it yummy science! Read more
FoodSci_p074
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Short (≤ 1 day)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Chemicals need to be specially ordered. Specialty items may be purchased from our partner . See the Materials section for details.
Cost Average ($40 - $80)
Safety Adult supervision may be needed for using a blender. All chemicals in this science project are safe to handle and eat (they are common food additives).
Science Fair Project Idea
You're probably familiar with sauerkraut, a German dish of cabbage that is fermented in a brine made of its own juice and salt. Have you heard of another cabbage dish, called kimchi? Kimchi is a traditional fermented cabbage dish from Korea. Koreans eat kimchi year round, enjoying its spicy taste and the fact that it contains loads of vitamins B and C. In this cooking and food science fair project, you will make kimchi from scratch and investigate changes in pH and glucose as the kimchi… Read more
FoodSci_p051
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- Less Details
Time Required Very Long (1+ months)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Specialty items: To obtain traditional Korean spices, you might have to go to an Asian market. But you can use commonly available substitutes, if desired.
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety No issues
Science Fair Project Idea
How do you like your steak? The internal temperatures for beefsteaks at various levels of "doneness" are as follows: medium-rare, 145°F; medium, 155°F; medium-well, 165°F; and well-done, 170°F. What factors determine how long you have to cook a steak to reach the desired temperature? The temperature of the steak before you start to cook it will clearly be important. The temperature the steak is cooked at will also be a factor. And of course, the thickness of the steak will… Read more
FoodSci_p037
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- Less Details
Time Required Short (2-5 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Adult supervision is recommended
Science Fair Project Idea
Gelatin! It's hard to think of another food that is used as frequently on the dinner table as off. You can find it in all sorts of sweet foods, from ice cream, yogurt, and gummy bears, to marshmallows and yellow colorings for sodas. Off the table, it shows up in glues, photographic paper, playing cards, crepe paper, medicine capsules, hair gels, and professional lighting equipment. From the kitchen to the theater—what a range of uses! In this cooking and food science fair project, you'll… Read more
FoodSci_p047
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Adult supervision is recommended when using the knife and hot gelatin.
Science Fair Project Idea
When you open a can of green beans, have you ever wondered why the beans are not mushy, or more like a puree? Canning requires boiling the beans for a long period of time to kill bacteria, so why don't the beans fall apart into small pieces? Some fruits and vegetables—like cherries, apples, potatoes, sweet potatoes, beets, carrots, beans, cauliflower, and tomatoes—have the ability to undergo hardening, or firming of their plant tissues. A special enzyme, called pectin methyl… Read more
FoodSci_p034
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety Adult supervision is recommended when using the stove.
Science Fair Project Idea
Nut clusters, chocolate-dipped candies, and chocolate-dipped strawberries are just some of the delicious goodies that have a thin, rich layer of chocolate wrapped around them. But how do pastry and candy chefs make these delectable treats? The first step is to melt and temper chocolate. Tempering is a process in which the cocoa butter in chocolate is hardened into a specific crystalline pattern. When the cocoa butter molecules are in this pattern, the chocolate is shiny and breaks with a sharp… Read more
FoodSci_p038
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- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Low ($20 - $50)
Safety Minor injury possible. Use caution when using a stovetop. Hot chocolate can burn. Use care when working with hot chocolate. Adult supervision recommended.
Science Fair Project Idea
Has a milk-based soup, sauce, or gravy ever curdled on you (formed lumps) as you were preparing it? Curdling is the process of coagulation that occurs where the proteins in the milk clump together. Sometimes curdling is desirable—for example, if you want to make a delicious cheese or yogurt—but if you are trying to make a milk-based soup or gratin, or if you're adding milk to a hot drink, curdling is very unwanted because you lose the smooth, creamy texture. Nobody likes clumps and… Read more
FoodSci_p029
+ More Details
- Less Details
Time Required Average (6-10 days)
Prerequisites None
Material Availability Readily available
Cost Very Low (under $20)
Safety Adult supervision is recommended when using the stove.
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