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STEM Activity
Catapults were mighty handy for pirates in the golden age of piracy (during the 17th century). And medieval knights used them centuries earlier for taking down massive castle walls. Even Greeks and Romans used catapults about 2,000 years ago! These simple machines are quite handy, as long as you know how to aim them! In this science activity you will try your hand at catapult technology. Can you predict where your cotton ball will land? Read more
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28 reviews
Have you ever been fascinated by things that glow in the dark? It can be a lot of fun to play with bracelets, wands, and other toys that are glow-in-the-dark, like some stickers and creepy, crawly, plastic insects! Have you ever wanted to make something at home that glows? It turns out that it is not that hard to do — all you need is tonic water and a black light! Some common household chemicals can also affect this beverage's glow. In this science activity, you will make tonic water glow… Read more
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Here's a challenge: Try throwing a paper airplane by moving just your wrist (don't move your elbow or shoulder). It's hard, isn't it? How could you get a paper airplane to fly far if you can use only a short distance to launch it? Try this activity to find out! Read more
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Have you ever wondered what a parachute and an open rain jacket have in common? They both trap air and slow you down when you move fast! In this activity, you design a parachute for a miniature action figure. Tissue paper or a plastic bag and a few strings is all it takes to make your figure into an expert skydiver. Read more
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3 reviews
Create a giant foaming reaction and wow your friends with this classic science demonstration! With just a few simple ingredients, you can make something that looks like toothpaste being squeezed from a tube—but so big, it must be for elephants! Read more
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4 reviews
Have you ever wondered why ice cubes in your cold drink become gradually smaller, or why their surface becomes smoother as they melt? Does ice always melt this way? In this activity, you will use water balloons to create giant ice balls and observe how they melt. Can you predict the effect a bit of salt will have on your giant ice ball? Read more
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1 review
It's gooey. It's sticky. It's slime! Learn to make your own homemade slime with this quick and easy recipe. Read more
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STEM Activity
Blast off! Have you ever played with a model or toy rocket, or seen a real rocket launch on TV? In this project you will make simple rockets out of paper and launch them by blowing into a drinking straw. Can you make the rocket that flies the farthest? Read more
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8 reviews
Do you like arts and crafts projects like drawing, painting, cutting shapes out of construction paper, or origami? Instead of drawing that bright sun or lights in a house, imagine adding real lights to your artwork! This project will show you how, by introducing you to the world of electronics with "paper circuits." Paper circuits are made with just a few simple items; you can use a battery and some copper tape to add tiny lights to your project. The best part is that it is easy to do, and you… Read more
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STEM Activity
Have you ever wanted to send your friend a secret message that no-one else can read? Then you might know of invisible ink—a special type of ink that you can use for writing and that does not show up on paper. Only after a special treatment will it appear again magically, and the message can be read. How does this work? Find out in this activity and write your own secret messages! Read more
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Free science fair projects.